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Jozani-Chwaka Bay Conservation Area

My fellow students (wanafunzi) and I spent the last two days closer to the eastern side of the island in a protect forest called Jozani-Chwaka Bay Conservation Area. While there, we spent the first day studying two different areas of mangroves and looking into and comparing the species density in the two areas.

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Instead of walking over the bridge, my group took a right unto the depths of the mangrove on the outter edge of the bridge. I did not know what to expect. Coming from Michigan and going to school in New York, I have never before experiences a mangrove. It was quite a bit different than what I expected.

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DSCN0483I was in a group of 4 including myself. The other student’s Swahili names were Salma, Latifa, and Eliza. My Swahili name is Fatma. I love saying ninaitwa Fatma. People here get a huge kick out of a white girl like me telling them to call me such a traditional name.

The techniques we used for collecting data on the mangroves include:

*A measuring tape to map out a circle with a 11.8meter radius.

*A diameter tape to obviously measure the diameter of the trees. We only included the data for trees at least 2cm in diameter and measured this at breast height.

*A 3meter stick to measure the height of the significant trees. Literally a stick with notches cut out at each meter. This part was slightly challenging with the trees reaching 10 plus meters but I we gave this job to Salma who I renamed Magic Stick as she excelled so exquisitely at this task.

SALMA MEASURING A TREE’S HEIGHT

(What a pro)

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WORKING HARD

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HARDLY WORKING 😛

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Muddy muddy mangrove. So many trees. So little time.

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The previous photos show our morning plot of mangroves in the protected area of Jozani.

Where as the following photo shows our mangrove plot in the unprotected area of Uzi Bay.

Check out the difference.

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Nature is so neat.

All of these trees are considered mangroves but the different type of tree and the area and substrate in which it is located can make all the difference.

NEXT we studies animals deep into the forest (It felt like a jungle to me)

We looked for a number of animal indication including:

*A visual of the animal itself

*Foot prints

*A loud call (generally from monkeys)

*Scat

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Our guide trashing his way through the trees and ferns

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And LASTLY, we observed MONKEYS!!!

Red Colobus Monkeys to be exact!

We basically just studied their behavior.

Were they…

*Sitting?

*Eating?

*Moving?

*Howling?

*Excreting their bowels?

*Copulating??

THEY WERE SO CLOSE AND THERE WERE SO MANY

Surreal surreal surreal

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What a cutie. Am I right??

I may be away from internet for the next two-ish weeks so don’t fret while I am away.

Stay wild and stay free!

~Olivia (Fatma)~

 

 

2 comments

    • Ghandi on March 2, 2015 at 8:29 am
    • Reply

    Figured you would be monkeying around

    • Ghandi on March 2, 2015 at 8:47 am
    • Reply

    Are the streetlights working well?

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