Publications

Download Dr. Moss-Racusin’s CV here.

Peer-Reviewed Publications (index = 19)

*Denotes undergraduate student +Denotes graduate student or postdoctoral student

  1. Pietri, E. S., Hennes, E. P., Dovidio, J. F., Brescoll, V. L., +Bailey, A., Moss-Racusin, C. A., & Handelsman, J. (2019). Addressing unintended consequences of gender diversity interventions on women’s sense of belonging in STEM. Sex Roles, 80, 527-547.
  2. Moss-Racusin, C.A., & *Rabasco, H. (2018). Reducing gender identity bias through imagined intergroup contact. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 48, 457-474.
  3. Moss-Racusin, C. A., *Sanzari, C., *Caluori, N., & *Rabasco, H. (2018). Gender bias produces gender gaps in STEM engagement. Sex Roles, 79, 651-670.
  4. Hennes, E. P., Pietri, E. S., Moss-Racusin, C. A., Mason, K. A., Dovidio, J. F., Brescoll, V. L., Bailey, A., & Handelsman, J. (2018). Increasing the perceived malleability of gender bias using a modified Video Intervention for Diversity in STEM (VIDS). Group Processes and Intergroup Relations, 21, 788-809.
  5. Moss-Racusin, C. A., +Pietri, E. S., +Hennes, E. P., Dovidio, J. F., Brescoll, V. L., +Roussos, G., & Handelsman, J. (2018). Reducing STEM gender bias with VIDS (Video Interventions for Diversity in Science). Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, 24, 236-260.
  6. *Khosla, N., Perry, S. P., Burke, S., Moss-Racusin, C. A., & Dovidio, J. F. (2018). A comparison of clinician’s racial biases in the United States and France. Social Science and Medicine, 206, 31-37.
  7. Sullivan, J., Moss-Racusin, C. A., Lopez, M., & *Williams, K. (2018). Backlash against gender stereotype-violating preschool children. PLoS ONE, 13: e0195503.
  8. Parker, L., Monteith, M., Moss-Racusin, C. A., & Van Camp, A. (2018). Promoting concern about gender bias with evidence-based confrontation. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 74, 8-23.
  9. Good, J. J., Sanchez, D. T., & Moss-Racusin, C. A. (2018). A paternalistic duty to protect? Predicting men’s decisions to confront sexism. Psychology of Men and Masculinity.
  10. Borelli, J. L., Nelson-Coffey, S. K., River, L. M., Birken, S. A., & Moss-Racusin, C. A. (2017). Bringing work home: Gender and parenting correlates of work-family guilt among parents of toddlers. Journal of Child and Family Studies.
  11. +Pietri, E., Moss-Racusin, C. A., Dovidio, J. F., Guha, D., Roussos, G., Brescoll, V. L., & Handelsman, J. (2017). Using video to increase gender bias literacy toward women in science. Psychology of Women Quarterly, 41, 175-196.
  12. Borelli, J. L., Nelson, S. K., River, L. M., Birken, S. A., & Moss-Racusin, C.A. (2017). Gender differences in work-family guilt in the parents of young children. Sex Roles, 76, 356-368.
  13. Moss-Racusin, C. A., van der Toorn, J., Dovidio, J. F., Brescoll, V. L., Graham, M. J, & Handelsman, J. (2016). A “Scientific Diversity” Intervention to Reduce Gender Bias in a Sample of Life Scientists. CBE-Life Sciences Education (Special Issue on Broadening Participation in the Life Science), ar29.
  14. Moss-Racusin, C.A., & *Johnson, E. R. (2016). Backlash against male elementary educators. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 46, 379-393.
  15. Moss-Racusin, C. A., & *Miller, H. G. (2016). “Taking charge” of stigma: Treatment seeking alleviates men’s mental illness stigma. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 46, 319-33
  16. Handley, I. M., Brown, E. R., Moss-Racusin, C. A., & Smith, J. L. (2015). The quality of evidence revealing subtle gender biases in science is in the eye of the beholder. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 43, 13201-13206.
    • Selected (through competitive process) for summary and inclusion in the Harvard Kennedy School Women and Public Policy Program Gender Action Portal.
  17. Moss-Racusin, C. A., & *Molenda, A. K., & *Cramer, C. (2015). Can evidence impact attitudes? Public reactions to experimental evidence of gender bias in STEM fields. Psychology of Women Quarterly, 39, 194-209.
  18. +Wilton, L. S., Good, J. J., Moss-Racusin, C. A., Sanchez, D. T. (2015). Communicating more than diversity: The effect of institutional diversity statements on expectations and performance as a function of race and gender. Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, 21, 315-325.
  19. +Young, D., Moss-Racusin, C. A., & Sanchez, D. T. (2014). Implicit agency, communality, and perceptual congruence in couples: Implications for relationship health. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 55, 133-138.
  20. Moss-Racusin, C. A., van der Toorn, J., Dovidio, J. F., V. L., Graham, M., & Handelsman, J. (2014). Scientific diversity interventions. Science, 343, 615-616.
  21. Rudman, L. A., +Mescher, K., & Moss-Racusin, C. A. (2013). Reactions to gender egalitarian men: Perceived feminization due to stigma-by-association? Group Processes and Intergroup Relations, 16, 572-599.
  22. Handelsman, J., & Moss-Racusin, C. A. (2013). Institute training to reduce bias. Nature, 495, 35-38.
  23. Moss-Racusin, C. A., Dovidio, J. F., Brescoll, V. L., Graham, M., & Handelsman, J. (2012). Science faculty’s subtle gender biases favor male students. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 109, 16474-16479.
    • Reprinted as Moss-Racusin, C. A., Dovidio, J. F., Brescoll, V. L., Graham, M., & Handelsman, J. (2012). Science faculty’s subtle gender biases favor male students. In Wyer, M., Barbercheck, M., Cookmeyer, D., Ozturk, H. O., & Wayne, M., Women, science and technology: A reader in feminist science studies. New York: Routledge, pp. 3-14.
    • Rated as “Exceptional” and “Must Read” by the Faculty of 1000.
    • Selected (through competitive process) for summary and inclusion in the Harvard Kennedy School Women and Public Policy Program Gender Action Portal.
  24. West, T., Heilman, M. E., Moss-Racusin, C. A., +Gullett, R., & Magee, J. C. (2012). Building blocks of bias: Gender composition predicts male and female group members’ evaluations of each other and the group. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 48, 1209-1212.
  25. Rudman, L.A., Moss-Racusin, C. A., Phelan, J. E., & +Nauts, S. (2012). Status incongruity and backlash effects: Defending the gender hierarchy motivates prejudice against female leaders. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 48, 165-179.
  26. Sanchez, D. T., Phelan, J. E., Moss-Racusin, C. A., & Good, J. J. (2012). A gender role motivation model of women’s sexually submissive behavior and satisfaction in couples. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 38, 528-539.
  27. Brescoll, V. L., Uhlmann, E. L., Moss-Racusin, C. A., & *Sarnell (2012). Masculinity, status and subordination: Why working for a stereotype violator causes men to lose status. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 48, 354-357.
    • Selected (through competitive process) for summary and inclusion in the Harvard Kennedy School Women and Public Policy Program Gender Action Portal.
  28. Good, J. J., Moss-Racusin, C. A., & Sanchez, D. T. (2012). When do we confront? Perceptions of costs and benefits predict confronting discrimination on behalf of the self and others. Psychology of Women Quarterly, 36, 210-226.
  29. Sanchez, D. T., Moss-Racusin, C. A., Phelan, J. E., & Crocker, J. (2011). Relationship Contingency and Sexual Motivation in Women: Implications for Sexual Satisfaction. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 40, 99-110.
  30. Moss-Racusin, C. A., Good, J. J., & Sanchez, D. T. (2010). The impact of collective gender identity on relationship quality: When men feel devalued. Psychology of Men and Masculinity, 11, 65-75.
  31. Moss-Racusin, C. A., Phelan, J. E., & Rudman, L. A. (2010a). “I’m not prejudiced, but…”: Compensatory egalitarianism in the 2008 Democratic presidential primary. Political Psychology, 31, 543-561.
  32. Moss-Racusin, C. A., Phelan, J. E., & Rudman, L. A. (2010b). When men break the gender rules: Status incongruity and backlash against modest men. Psychology of Men and Masculinity, 11, 140-151.
  33. Moss-Racusin, C. A., & Rudman, L. A. (2010). Disruptions in women’s self-promotion: The backlash avoidance model. Psychology of Women Quarterly, 34, 186-202.
  34. Moss-Racusin, C. A., & Good, J. J. (shared first authorship). (2010). “But, that doesn’t apply to me”: Teaching college students to think about gender. Psychology of Women Quarterly, 34, 418-421.
  35. Phelan, J. E, Moss-Racusin, C. A., & Rudman, L. A. (2008). Competent yet out in the cold: Shifting criteria for hiring reflect backlash towards agentic women. Psychology of Women Quarterly, 32, 406-413.
  36. Puhl, R. M., Moss-Racusin, C. A., Schwartz, M. B, & Brownell, K. D. (2008). Weight stigmatization and bias reduction: Perspectives of overweight and obese adults. Health Education Research, 23, 347-358.
  37. Puhl, R. M., Moss-Racusin, C. A., & Schwartz, M. B. (2007). Internalization of weight bias: Implications for binge eating and emotional well-being. Obesity, 15, 19-23.

Chapters

  • Good, J. J., Woodzicka. J. A., Bourne, K. A., & Moss-Racusin, C. A. (2019). The decision to act: Intrapersonal and situational factors that predict women’s and men’s decisions to confront sexism. In R. Mallett and M. Monteith (Eds.), Confronting Prejudice and Discrimination: The Science of Changing Minds and Behaviors. Elsevier.
  • Moss-Racusin, C. A. (2014). Male backlash: Organizational penalties for men who violate gender stereotypes. In Burke, R., & Major, D. (Eds.), Gender in Organizations. London: Edward Elgar Publishing, pp. 247-269.
  • Dovidio, J. F., +Thomas, E. L., Moss-Racusin, C. A., Brescoll, V. L., Graham, M. J., & Handelsman, J. (2013). Included but invisible? The benefits and costs of inclusion. Gender & work: Challenging conventional wisdom. Cambridge: Harvard Business School Press.
  • Rudman, L. A., Moss-Racusin, C. A., Glick, P., & Phelan, J. E. (2012). Reactions to vanguards: Advances in backlash theory. In Devine, P. G., & Plant, E. A. (Eds.), Advances in Experimental Social Psychology, 45, pp. 167-227.
  • Moss, N. E., Racusin, G. R., & Moss-Racusin, C. A. (2007). Group therapy with children and adolescents. In Martin, A., & Volkmar, F. (Eds.), Child and Adolescent Psychiatry: A Comprehensive Textbook, 3rd ed. Baltimore: Williams & Wilkins.

Other Publications

  • Moss-Racusin, C. A., & Good, J. G. (2015). Measure of a man: Outcomes of gender stereotyping for men and masculinity. Social Psychology, 46, 179-181.
  • Conner, A., Cook, K. S., Correll, S. J., Markus, H. R., Moss-Racusin, C. A., Muller, C. B., Raymond, J. L., & Simard, C. (2014). Obscuring gender bias with “choice.” Science, 6176, 1200.
  • Moss-Racusin, C. A. (2014). Relationship contingency and sexual satisfaction. In Michalos, A. C. (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Quality of Life Research. Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer, pp. 5430-5433.
  • Moss-Racusin, C. A. (2013). Gender bias also contributes to the attrition of women in science. BioScience, 63, 318.
  • Moss-Racusin, C. A. (2012). Are science faculty biased against female students? PSP Connections (Society for Personality and Social Psychology Commentary and Analysis website).
  • Prime, J., Foust-Cummings, H., +Salib, E. R., & Moss-Racusin, C. A. (2012). Calling all white men: Can training help create inclusive workplaces? New York: Catalyst.
  • Prime, J., Moss-Racusin, C. A, & Foust-Cummings, H. (2010). Engaging men in gender initiatives: Stacking the deck for success. New York: Catalyst.
  • Prime, J., & Moss-Racusin, C. A. (2009). Engaging men in gender initiatives: What change agents need to know. New York: Catalyst.
  • Brescoll, V. L., & Moss-Racusin, C. A. (2007). How to walk the tightrope of “nice and able:” Overcoming workplace challenges for female bosses. Psychology of Women Quarterly, 31, 217-218.
  • Moss-Racusin, C. A., & Heilman, M. E. (2005). Interpersonal penalties for failure behavior on sex-consistent domains. Inquiry: Journal of Undergraduate Research, 9, 36.

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